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Apple has killed off iTunes – but how will this affect DJ’s?

by Jun 6, 2019Latest Updates, News

Apple have killed off iTunes – what does this mean for musicians and DJ’s?

 

Apple’s classic music storing and playback software iTunes has been axed by Apple for their forthcoming OSX update, Catalina.

 

Many people have been freaking out about what’s going to happen to their music collection – but worry no more, Apple have stepped in with some comments to quell our fears.

 

While iTunes will indeed be dropped, it will be replaced with three new apps, which will essentially perform the same tasks as iTunes, but in three less-power-consuming forms.

 

No major functions will be affected bit iTunes death – you will still have your music collection, be able to use gift cards, and backing up your iPhone (if you have one) will be switched onto Finder, which actually makes a lot more sense than using iTunes.

 

 

How will it affect DJ’s?

 

 

No purchases of self-owned music will be lost in the update either – music will go under ‘Music’, films under ‘Movies’ and books into ‘Apple Books’ – they all speak for themselves.

 

But more specialised music users – namely producers and DJ’s are worried about how this may affect their work.

 

Much production and DJ software use iTunes as an integral part of their mechanics. For example, Serato DJ & Pioneer Rekordbox both use iTunes to organise playlists. Certain DJ’s have spent years perfecting and crafting their playlists – and Apple hasn’t made it clear whether this update is going to affect playlists, and how iTunes interacts with other software.

 

iTunes also had lots of great features. One such is its compression feature. iTunes has the fastest compressor of any major software, and allows users to convert large music files like .WAV and .FLAC into smaller, more manageable file types such as MP3 – and it also allows a load of customisation for this process.

 

So, iTunes will be dearly missed by all – but hopefully Apple won’t mess around with its core functionality too much.